Accrual of inheritance involving assets abroad – complexity frequently underestimated

An international accrual of inheritance is given when for example a German testator holds assets abroad or vice versa a foreign testator holds assets in Germany. Due to the different national regulations in each country the international assets of e.g. Germans involve significant civil and fiscal-law risks if not structured carefully. Therefore it is advisable to concern oneself with this subject during one´s lifetime and to take corresponding measures if possible.

The complexity of international accrual of inheritance is frequently underestimated. As a fundamental rule, accrual of inheritance with a foreign connection and thus an “international accrual of inheritance” is given as soon as a German testator holds assets abroad (e.g. a finca in Spain), or upon the death of a foreigner holding assets in Germany. The international assets of Germans involve significant civil and fiscal-law risks if not structured carefully.

The reason lies in the fact that, as a fundamental rule, the national law of succession in each country regulates who will become an heir, the level of inheritance shares or compulsory portions, which formal regulations apply to wills and the manner in which heirs can prove their rights. The national regulations of the individual countries are very different in this respect. These differing regulations can mean that the same accrual of inheritance is assessed and treated differently from country to country. In addition, certificates of inheritance from one country are in part frequently not accepted in other countries. As a result, it may be necessary for heirs to make parallel applications for certificates of inheritance in various countries.

Which substantive law (of succession) is applicable in the event of international accrual of inheritance (given the absence of precautionary measures while still alive) is a matter that frequently cannot be clearly ascertained, as this question is based on the respective private international law (IPR) of the country concerned.

 

Example case 1:

A French national has her last place of residence in Germany and leaves behind (just) a substantial bank balance in Germany.

Under German IPR, French law of succession is applicable; from the perspective of French IPR, German law of succession applies.

The reason for this lies in the differing connecting factors used to determine the applicable law in the individual countries. While German IPR is based on nationality as a fundamental rule, French IPR uses the connection of the testator’s last place of residence to determine the applicable law regarding the movable property.

Nevertheless, the question of applicable law is of elementary importance as shown above.

 

Example case 2:

The married couple Hartmut and Anita both have German nationality. They have movable and immovable assets in Germany, Switzerland and Spain. They have their regular place of residence in Switzerland. The married couple have a common daughter with whom they have, however, fallen out, with the result that the married couple have drawn up a joint will (without a notary) in which they disinherit their daughter.

From a German perspective, German law of succession would be applicable in the event of the death of one of the two spouses; from a Swiss perspective, Swiss law of succession would apply. This has far-reaching consequences, as Swiss law fundamentally does not recognise joint wills drawn up “uno acto”, meaning that from a Swiss perspective – not from a German one – the daughter has not been effectively disinherited and could claim her statutory share of the inheritance.

To avoid such collisions between the differing legal systems, it is advisable to concern oneself with this subject during one’s lifetime, and to take corresponding measures if possible.

 

Dirk W. Kolvenbach is a German attorney at law and Senior Partner with HEUKING KÜHN LÜER WOJTEK in Zurich and Dusseldorf. Further, he is the head of the Practice Group “Private Clients” and a renowned specialist in all Private Clients matters (e.g. succession, asset protection and transaction).

 

Dirk Kolvenbach
Dirk W. Kolvenbach
Company: Heuking Kühn Lüer Wojtek
Phone: (+49)21160055265
Website: www.heuking.de
E-mail: D.Kolvenbach@heuking.de

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